University of Hertfordshire

From the same journal

By the same authors

Documents

  • Julius Burkauskas
  • Konstantinos Ioannidis
  • Samuel Chamberlain
  • Henrietta Bowden-Jones
  • Inga Griskova-Bulanova
  • Aiste Pranckeviciene
  • Artemisa Dores
  • Irene Carvalho
  • Fernando Barbosa
  • Pierluigi Simonato
  • Ilaria De Luca
  • Rosin Mooney
  • Maria Gómez-Martínez
  • Zsolt Demetrovics
  • Krisztina Ábel
  • Attila Szabo
  • Hironobu Fujiwara
  • Mami Shibata
  • Alejandra Melero-Ventola
  • Eva Arroyo-Anlló
  • Ricardo Santos-Labrador
  • Kei Kobayashi
  • Francesco Di Carlo
  • Cristina Monteiro
  • Giovanni Martinotti
View graph of relations
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere8823
Number of pages18
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume19
Issue14
Early online date20 Jul 2022
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 20 Jul 2022

Abstract

This cross-sectional study aimed to explore specific online behaviours and their association with a range of underlying psychological and other behavioural factors during the COVID-19 pandemic. Eight countries (Italy, Spain, the United Kingdom, Lithuania, Portugal, Japan, Hungary, and Brazil) participated in an international investigation involving 2223 participants (M = 33 years old; SD = 11), 70% of whom were females. Participants were surveyed for specific type of Internet use severity, appearance anxiety, self-compassion, and image and use of performance-enhancing drugs (IPEDs). Results were compared cross-culturally. The mean time spent online was 5 h (SD = ±3) of daily browsing during the pandemic. The most commonly performed activities included social networking, streaming, and general surfing. A strong association between these online behaviours and appearance anxiety, self-compassion, and IPEDs use was found after adjustment for possible confounders, with higher scores being associated with specific online activities. Significant cross-cultural differences also emerged in terms of the amount of time spent online during the initial stages of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Notes

© 2022 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)

ID: 27944333