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Physiotherapy for Patients with Sciatica Awaiting Lumbar Micro-Discectomy Surgery: a Nested, Qualitative Study of Patients’ Views and Experiences. / Boote, Jonathan; Newsome, Ruth ; Reddington, Michael; Cole, Ashley; Dimairo, Munya.

In: Physiotherapy Research International, Vol. 22, No. 3, e1665, 13.07.2017.

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@article{aaea9bfd288644cb8ce2d5ca99b1721a,
title = "Physiotherapy for Patients with Sciatica Awaiting Lumbar Micro-Discectomy Surgery: a Nested, Qualitative Study of Patients{\textquoteright} Views and Experiences",
abstract = "AbstractBackground and PurposeSciatica is a common clinical condition that can be extremely painful, disabling and life-changing. Whether conservative or surgical treatment for sciatica secondary to an intervertebral disc prolapse is most effective is still much debated. An important component of conservative treatment is physiotherapy, which aims to promote physical and psychological health for the patient, whilst resorption of the disc takes place. This paper reports a qualitative study of patients' views and experiences of a bespoke physiotherapy intervention for the treatment of sciatica.MethodsA qualitative study nested within a pilot randomized controlled trial of bespoke physiotherapy for the treatment of patients with sciatica awaiting lumbar microdiscectomy surgery. Patients randomized to receive bespoke physiotherapy in the intervention arm of the trial were invited to take part in semi-structured interviews. Twenty-one in-depth, semi-structured interviews took place. All interviews were recorded, fully transcribed and thematically analysed.ResultsMost patients in the sample found the physiotherapy valuable, appreciating the individual nature of the approach, the exercises to reduce pain and discomfort, techniques for improving functional spinal movement, walking and dynamic posture, and manual therapy and cardiovascular exercise. A small number did not find the physiotherapy of benefit. Sixteen patients in the sample went on to proceed with surgery, but most of these found value in having had the physiotherapy first.DiscussionMany patients with sciatica appreciate the value of physiotherapy prior to surgery. Future research should examine patients' experiences of bespoke physiotherapy delivered within primary care. Copyright {\textcopyright} 2016 The Authors Physiotherapy Research International published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.",
keywords = "physical therapy modalities, qualitative research, sciatica",
author = "Jonathan Boote and Ruth Newsome and Michael Reddington and Ashley Cole and Munya Dimairo",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2016 The Authors Physiotherapy Research International published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. ",
year = "2017",
month = jul,
day = "13",
doi = "10.1002/pri.1665",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
journal = "Physiotherapy Research International",
issn = "1358-2267",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Physiotherapy for Patients with Sciatica Awaiting Lumbar Micro-Discectomy Surgery: a Nested, Qualitative Study of Patients’ Views and Experiences

AU - Boote, Jonathan

AU - Newsome, Ruth

AU - Reddington, Michael

AU - Cole, Ashley

AU - Dimairo, Munya

N1 - Copyright © 2016 The Authors Physiotherapy Research International published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

PY - 2017/7/13

Y1 - 2017/7/13

N2 - AbstractBackground and PurposeSciatica is a common clinical condition that can be extremely painful, disabling and life-changing. Whether conservative or surgical treatment for sciatica secondary to an intervertebral disc prolapse is most effective is still much debated. An important component of conservative treatment is physiotherapy, which aims to promote physical and psychological health for the patient, whilst resorption of the disc takes place. This paper reports a qualitative study of patients' views and experiences of a bespoke physiotherapy intervention for the treatment of sciatica.MethodsA qualitative study nested within a pilot randomized controlled trial of bespoke physiotherapy for the treatment of patients with sciatica awaiting lumbar microdiscectomy surgery. Patients randomized to receive bespoke physiotherapy in the intervention arm of the trial were invited to take part in semi-structured interviews. Twenty-one in-depth, semi-structured interviews took place. All interviews were recorded, fully transcribed and thematically analysed.ResultsMost patients in the sample found the physiotherapy valuable, appreciating the individual nature of the approach, the exercises to reduce pain and discomfort, techniques for improving functional spinal movement, walking and dynamic posture, and manual therapy and cardiovascular exercise. A small number did not find the physiotherapy of benefit. Sixteen patients in the sample went on to proceed with surgery, but most of these found value in having had the physiotherapy first.DiscussionMany patients with sciatica appreciate the value of physiotherapy prior to surgery. Future research should examine patients' experiences of bespoke physiotherapy delivered within primary care. Copyright © 2016 The Authors Physiotherapy Research International published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

AB - AbstractBackground and PurposeSciatica is a common clinical condition that can be extremely painful, disabling and life-changing. Whether conservative or surgical treatment for sciatica secondary to an intervertebral disc prolapse is most effective is still much debated. An important component of conservative treatment is physiotherapy, which aims to promote physical and psychological health for the patient, whilst resorption of the disc takes place. This paper reports a qualitative study of patients' views and experiences of a bespoke physiotherapy intervention for the treatment of sciatica.MethodsA qualitative study nested within a pilot randomized controlled trial of bespoke physiotherapy for the treatment of patients with sciatica awaiting lumbar microdiscectomy surgery. Patients randomized to receive bespoke physiotherapy in the intervention arm of the trial were invited to take part in semi-structured interviews. Twenty-one in-depth, semi-structured interviews took place. All interviews were recorded, fully transcribed and thematically analysed.ResultsMost patients in the sample found the physiotherapy valuable, appreciating the individual nature of the approach, the exercises to reduce pain and discomfort, techniques for improving functional spinal movement, walking and dynamic posture, and manual therapy and cardiovascular exercise. A small number did not find the physiotherapy of benefit. Sixteen patients in the sample went on to proceed with surgery, but most of these found value in having had the physiotherapy first.DiscussionMany patients with sciatica appreciate the value of physiotherapy prior to surgery. Future research should examine patients' experiences of bespoke physiotherapy delivered within primary care. Copyright © 2016 The Authors Physiotherapy Research International published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

KW - physical therapy modalities

KW - qualitative research

KW - sciatica

U2 - 10.1002/pri.1665

DO - 10.1002/pri.1665

M3 - Article

VL - 22

JO - Physiotherapy Research International

JF - Physiotherapy Research International

SN - 1358-2267

IS - 3

M1 - e1665

ER -