University of Hertfordshire

By the same authors

Prince Peter Kropotkin: Anarchism, Eugenics and the Utopian Ideal of Letchworth Garden City

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

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Prince Peter Kropotkin : Anarchism, Eugenics and the Utopian Ideal of Letchworth Garden City. / Simpson, Patricia.

2015. Paper presented at Utopia! Experiments in Perfection, Letchworth, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

Harvard

Simpson, P 2015, 'Prince Peter Kropotkin: Anarchism, Eugenics and the Utopian Ideal of Letchworth Garden City', Paper presented at Utopia! Experiments in Perfection, Letchworth, United Kingdom, 12/11/15 - 12/11/15.

APA

Simpson, P. (2015). Prince Peter Kropotkin: Anarchism, Eugenics and the Utopian Ideal of Letchworth Garden City. Paper presented at Utopia! Experiments in Perfection, Letchworth, United Kingdom.

Vancouver

Simpson P. Prince Peter Kropotkin: Anarchism, Eugenics and the Utopian Ideal of Letchworth Garden City. 2015. Paper presented at Utopia! Experiments in Perfection, Letchworth, United Kingdom.

Author

Simpson, Patricia. / Prince Peter Kropotkin : Anarchism, Eugenics and the Utopian Ideal of Letchworth Garden City. Paper presented at Utopia! Experiments in Perfection, Letchworth, United Kingdom.

Bibtex

@conference{123e3e234ca64965bc98ef451aa928f6,
title = "Prince Peter Kropotkin: Anarchism, Eugenics and the Utopian Ideal of Letchworth Garden City",
abstract = "Ebenezer Howard{\textquoteright}s book Garden Cities of Tomorrow (1898), referred to the precedents for his ideas in the writings of Prince Peter Kropotkin and William Morris. Kropotkin was pre-Revolutionary socialist, who, prior to the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution, theorised an anarchist [ie. without a centralised government and associated administrative bureaucracy] theory of a potential utopian form of social existence. Like the English utopian socialist, William Morris (who may have drawn on Kropotkin{\textquoteright}s work), Kropotkin{\textquoteright}s ideal was of a semi-agrarian idyll as set out in his book, Farms, Fields and Factories (1898), comprising both intellectual and physical labour. Kropotkin was also very interested in the new discourse area of eugenics, and prominently participated in debates during the 1912 International Congress of Eugenics in London, defending euthenical ideas of a healthy lifestyle. This paper asks three questions. Firstly: Why should Ebenezer Howard reference the ideas of a Russian anarchist, in relation to the utopian ideal of the Garden City as a possible element of a capitalist economic structure? Secondly: was Kropotkin reciprocally interested in Letchworth? Thirdly: did Kropotkin ever visit Letchworth? In relation to these questions I will argue firstly that Howard's reference to Kropotkin may have been bases on how Kropotkin was contemporarily perceived in Britain– as a serious scientific, academic writer, rather than a dangerous anarchist. I will also argue that not only was Kropotkin interested in the Letchworth experiment, but most probably visited the Garden City at least once. ",
keywords = "Letchworth, utopia, Ebeneezer Howard, Peter Kropotkin, William Morris, John Ruskin, Anarchism, Eugenics",
author = "Patricia Simpson",
note = "Patricia Simpson, {\textquoteleft}Prince Peter Kropotkin: Anarchism, Eugenics and the Utopian Ideal of Letchworth Garden City{\textquoteright}, paper presented at Utopia! Experiments in Perfection, Letchworth Garden City, UK, 12 November, 2015. ; Utopia! Experiments in Perfection ; Conference date: 12-11-2015 Through 12-11-2015",
year = "2015",
month = nov,
day = "12",
language = "English",

}

RIS

TY - CONF

T1 - Prince Peter Kropotkin

T2 - Utopia! Experiments in Perfection

AU - Simpson, Patricia

N1 - Patricia Simpson, ‘Prince Peter Kropotkin: Anarchism, Eugenics and the Utopian Ideal of Letchworth Garden City’, paper presented at Utopia! Experiments in Perfection, Letchworth Garden City, UK, 12 November, 2015.

PY - 2015/11/12

Y1 - 2015/11/12

N2 - Ebenezer Howard’s book Garden Cities of Tomorrow (1898), referred to the precedents for his ideas in the writings of Prince Peter Kropotkin and William Morris. Kropotkin was pre-Revolutionary socialist, who, prior to the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution, theorised an anarchist [ie. without a centralised government and associated administrative bureaucracy] theory of a potential utopian form of social existence. Like the English utopian socialist, William Morris (who may have drawn on Kropotkin’s work), Kropotkin’s ideal was of a semi-agrarian idyll as set out in his book, Farms, Fields and Factories (1898), comprising both intellectual and physical labour. Kropotkin was also very interested in the new discourse area of eugenics, and prominently participated in debates during the 1912 International Congress of Eugenics in London, defending euthenical ideas of a healthy lifestyle. This paper asks three questions. Firstly: Why should Ebenezer Howard reference the ideas of a Russian anarchist, in relation to the utopian ideal of the Garden City as a possible element of a capitalist economic structure? Secondly: was Kropotkin reciprocally interested in Letchworth? Thirdly: did Kropotkin ever visit Letchworth? In relation to these questions I will argue firstly that Howard's reference to Kropotkin may have been bases on how Kropotkin was contemporarily perceived in Britain– as a serious scientific, academic writer, rather than a dangerous anarchist. I will also argue that not only was Kropotkin interested in the Letchworth experiment, but most probably visited the Garden City at least once.

AB - Ebenezer Howard’s book Garden Cities of Tomorrow (1898), referred to the precedents for his ideas in the writings of Prince Peter Kropotkin and William Morris. Kropotkin was pre-Revolutionary socialist, who, prior to the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution, theorised an anarchist [ie. without a centralised government and associated administrative bureaucracy] theory of a potential utopian form of social existence. Like the English utopian socialist, William Morris (who may have drawn on Kropotkin’s work), Kropotkin’s ideal was of a semi-agrarian idyll as set out in his book, Farms, Fields and Factories (1898), comprising both intellectual and physical labour. Kropotkin was also very interested in the new discourse area of eugenics, and prominently participated in debates during the 1912 International Congress of Eugenics in London, defending euthenical ideas of a healthy lifestyle. This paper asks three questions. Firstly: Why should Ebenezer Howard reference the ideas of a Russian anarchist, in relation to the utopian ideal of the Garden City as a possible element of a capitalist economic structure? Secondly: was Kropotkin reciprocally interested in Letchworth? Thirdly: did Kropotkin ever visit Letchworth? In relation to these questions I will argue firstly that Howard's reference to Kropotkin may have been bases on how Kropotkin was contemporarily perceived in Britain– as a serious scientific, academic writer, rather than a dangerous anarchist. I will also argue that not only was Kropotkin interested in the Letchworth experiment, but most probably visited the Garden City at least once.

KW - Letchworth

KW - utopia

KW - Ebeneezer Howard

KW - Peter Kropotkin

KW - William Morris

KW - John Ruskin

KW - Anarchism

KW - Eugenics

M3 - Paper

Y2 - 12 November 2015 through 12 November 2015

ER -