University of Hertfordshire

By the same authors

Rock avalanche dating in the Valais, Switzerland

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterpeer-review

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Rock avalanche dating in the Valais, Switzerland. / Sands, Timothy.

2017. Poster session presented at Engineering Geology 50 Conference, Portsmouth, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterpeer-review

Harvard

Sands, T 2017, 'Rock avalanche dating in the Valais, Switzerland', Engineering Geology 50 Conference, Portsmouth, United Kingdom, 5/07/17 - 7/07/17.

APA

Sands, T. (2017). Rock avalanche dating in the Valais, Switzerland. Poster session presented at Engineering Geology 50 Conference, Portsmouth, United Kingdom.

Vancouver

Sands T. Rock avalanche dating in the Valais, Switzerland. 2017. Poster session presented at Engineering Geology 50 Conference, Portsmouth, United Kingdom.

Author

Sands, Timothy. / Rock avalanche dating in the Valais, Switzerland. Poster session presented at Engineering Geology 50 Conference, Portsmouth, United Kingdom.

Bibtex

@conference{8084e777262640bd802eb8db0aa88615,
title = "Rock avalanche dating in the Valais, Switzerland",
abstract = "The Saaser Vispa valley in the Valais, Switzerland, is a deglaciated valley in the Alps that has been affected by ancient rock avalanche (Bergsturz) events. These rock avalanches have mainly occurred on west facing valley sides, due to rockslides along discontinuities within mica schists dipping at around 40º into the valley. The avalanches have modified the steep glaciated {\textquoteleft}U shape{\textquoteright} valley side into less steep slopes that have enabled forestry and pastures for cattle. The avalanche deposits have been colonised by vegetation including larch trees Larix decidua. The avalanches are probably due to paraglacial adjustment following deglaciation of the valley. The removal of glacial ice buttressing and resulting stress relief cause discontinuities to open, into which snowmelt and rainwater initiate weakening of the steep rock slopes until catastrophic failure occurs, resulting in rockslides and avalanches. It is probable that the rockslides have occurred within the last several thousand years. Lichenometry and dendrochronology are being used to estimate the age of the rock avalanche deposits.",
author = "Timothy Sands",
year = "2017",
month = jul,
day = "5",
language = "English",
note = "Engineering Geology 50 Conference, EG50 ; Conference date: 05-07-2017 Through 07-07-2017",

}

RIS

TY - CONF

T1 - Rock avalanche dating in the Valais, Switzerland

AU - Sands, Timothy

PY - 2017/7/5

Y1 - 2017/7/5

N2 - The Saaser Vispa valley in the Valais, Switzerland, is a deglaciated valley in the Alps that has been affected by ancient rock avalanche (Bergsturz) events. These rock avalanches have mainly occurred on west facing valley sides, due to rockslides along discontinuities within mica schists dipping at around 40º into the valley. The avalanches have modified the steep glaciated ‘U shape’ valley side into less steep slopes that have enabled forestry and pastures for cattle. The avalanche deposits have been colonised by vegetation including larch trees Larix decidua. The avalanches are probably due to paraglacial adjustment following deglaciation of the valley. The removal of glacial ice buttressing and resulting stress relief cause discontinuities to open, into which snowmelt and rainwater initiate weakening of the steep rock slopes until catastrophic failure occurs, resulting in rockslides and avalanches. It is probable that the rockslides have occurred within the last several thousand years. Lichenometry and dendrochronology are being used to estimate the age of the rock avalanche deposits.

AB - The Saaser Vispa valley in the Valais, Switzerland, is a deglaciated valley in the Alps that has been affected by ancient rock avalanche (Bergsturz) events. These rock avalanches have mainly occurred on west facing valley sides, due to rockslides along discontinuities within mica schists dipping at around 40º into the valley. The avalanches have modified the steep glaciated ‘U shape’ valley side into less steep slopes that have enabled forestry and pastures for cattle. The avalanche deposits have been colonised by vegetation including larch trees Larix decidua. The avalanches are probably due to paraglacial adjustment following deglaciation of the valley. The removal of glacial ice buttressing and resulting stress relief cause discontinuities to open, into which snowmelt and rainwater initiate weakening of the steep rock slopes until catastrophic failure occurs, resulting in rockslides and avalanches. It is probable that the rockslides have occurred within the last several thousand years. Lichenometry and dendrochronology are being used to estimate the age of the rock avalanche deposits.

M3 - Poster

T2 - Engineering Geology 50 Conference

Y2 - 5 July 2017 through 7 July 2017

ER -