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The role of acculturation in the relationship between self-stigma and psychological distress among Chinese American breast cancer survivors. / Warmoth, Krystal; Wong, Celia C Y; Chen, Lingjun; Ivy, Shelby; Lu, Qian.

In: Psychology, Health and Medicine, Vol. 25, No. 10, 12.2020, p. 1278-1292.

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@article{2e1c880b753348288ddd7231085eeeff,
title = "The role of acculturation in the relationship between self-stigma and psychological distress among Chinese American breast cancer survivors",
abstract = "Attitudes about breast cancer have improved in the USA, yet stigma is still present in some ethnic and immigrant populations and affecting survivors' experiences. Chinese American breast cancer survivors report negative beliefs and stigma to be a major stressor; this could result in mental health consequences. We hypothesized that greater self-stigma will be related to greater psychological distress (namely, depressive symptoms, and perceived stress). Furthermore, we expected that the association between self-stigma and psychological distress will be stronger among Chinese American breast cancer survivors who are less acculturated to the USA than those who are highly acculturated. One hundred and thirty-six Chinese American breast cancer survivors completed questionnaires that measured self-stigma, acculturation, depressive symptoms, perceived stress, and demographic information. Hierarchical linear regressions were conducted to examine the main effect of stigma on depressive symptoms and perceived stress, and the moderating effect of acculturation. As predicted, self-stigma was associated with greater depressive symptoms and perceived stress among Chinese American breast cancer survivors, especially those who are less acculturated. Self-stigma may play a part in psychological adjustment among Chinese American breast cancer survivors. Interventions that incorporate techniques to reduce self-stigma could be beneficial for Chinese American breast cancer survivors, especially for those who are less acculturated to American society.",
keywords = "Asian Americans, adjustment, breast cancer, culture, depression, perceived stress",
author = "Krystal Warmoth and Wong, {Celia C Y} and Lingjun Chen and Shelby Ivy and Qian Lu",
note = "Funding Information: The authors would like to thank the Herald Cancer Association for supporting the recruitment and data collection for this study. This study was supported by the American Cancer Society MRSGT-10-011-01-CPPB (PI: Qian Lu). Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. ",
year = "2020",
month = dec,
doi = "10.1080/13548506.2020.1734638",
language = "English",
volume = "25",
pages = "1278--1292",
journal = "Psychology, Health and Medicine",
issn = "1354-8506",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The role of acculturation in the relationship between self-stigma and psychological distress among Chinese American breast cancer survivors

AU - Warmoth, Krystal

AU - Wong, Celia C Y

AU - Chen, Lingjun

AU - Ivy, Shelby

AU - Lu, Qian

N1 - Funding Information: The authors would like to thank the Herald Cancer Association for supporting the recruitment and data collection for this study. This study was supported by the American Cancer Society MRSGT-10-011-01-CPPB (PI: Qian Lu). Publisher Copyright: © 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

PY - 2020/12

Y1 - 2020/12

N2 - Attitudes about breast cancer have improved in the USA, yet stigma is still present in some ethnic and immigrant populations and affecting survivors' experiences. Chinese American breast cancer survivors report negative beliefs and stigma to be a major stressor; this could result in mental health consequences. We hypothesized that greater self-stigma will be related to greater psychological distress (namely, depressive symptoms, and perceived stress). Furthermore, we expected that the association between self-stigma and psychological distress will be stronger among Chinese American breast cancer survivors who are less acculturated to the USA than those who are highly acculturated. One hundred and thirty-six Chinese American breast cancer survivors completed questionnaires that measured self-stigma, acculturation, depressive symptoms, perceived stress, and demographic information. Hierarchical linear regressions were conducted to examine the main effect of stigma on depressive symptoms and perceived stress, and the moderating effect of acculturation. As predicted, self-stigma was associated with greater depressive symptoms and perceived stress among Chinese American breast cancer survivors, especially those who are less acculturated. Self-stigma may play a part in psychological adjustment among Chinese American breast cancer survivors. Interventions that incorporate techniques to reduce self-stigma could be beneficial for Chinese American breast cancer survivors, especially for those who are less acculturated to American society.

AB - Attitudes about breast cancer have improved in the USA, yet stigma is still present in some ethnic and immigrant populations and affecting survivors' experiences. Chinese American breast cancer survivors report negative beliefs and stigma to be a major stressor; this could result in mental health consequences. We hypothesized that greater self-stigma will be related to greater psychological distress (namely, depressive symptoms, and perceived stress). Furthermore, we expected that the association between self-stigma and psychological distress will be stronger among Chinese American breast cancer survivors who are less acculturated to the USA than those who are highly acculturated. One hundred and thirty-six Chinese American breast cancer survivors completed questionnaires that measured self-stigma, acculturation, depressive symptoms, perceived stress, and demographic information. Hierarchical linear regressions were conducted to examine the main effect of stigma on depressive symptoms and perceived stress, and the moderating effect of acculturation. As predicted, self-stigma was associated with greater depressive symptoms and perceived stress among Chinese American breast cancer survivors, especially those who are less acculturated. Self-stigma may play a part in psychological adjustment among Chinese American breast cancer survivors. Interventions that incorporate techniques to reduce self-stigma could be beneficial for Chinese American breast cancer survivors, especially for those who are less acculturated to American society.

KW - Asian Americans

KW - adjustment

KW - breast cancer

KW - culture

KW - depression

KW - perceived stress

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85081729809&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/13548506.2020.1734638

DO - 10.1080/13548506.2020.1734638

M3 - Article

C2 - 32174167

VL - 25

SP - 1278

EP - 1292

JO - Psychology, Health and Medicine

JF - Psychology, Health and Medicine

SN - 1354-8506

IS - 10

ER -