University of Hertfordshire

By the same authors

What are the benefits of using silicon as a nutrient for strawberry growth?

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

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What are the benefits of using silicon as a nutrient for strawberry growth? / Wileman, H J ; Hall, Avice; Asiana, Carmilla.

2019. Poster session presented at Biostimulants World Congress, Barcelona, Spain.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Harvard

Wileman, HJ, Hall, A & Asiana, C 2019, 'What are the benefits of using silicon as a nutrient for strawberry growth?', Biostimulants World Congress, Barcelona, Spain, 18/11/19 - 21/11/19.

APA

Wileman, H. J., Hall, A., & Asiana, C. (2019). What are the benefits of using silicon as a nutrient for strawberry growth?. Poster session presented at Biostimulants World Congress, Barcelona, Spain.

Vancouver

Wileman HJ, Hall A, Asiana C. What are the benefits of using silicon as a nutrient for strawberry growth?. 2019. Poster session presented at Biostimulants World Congress, Barcelona, Spain.

Author

Wileman, H J ; Hall, Avice ; Asiana, Carmilla. / What are the benefits of using silicon as a nutrient for strawberry growth?. Poster session presented at Biostimulants World Congress, Barcelona, Spain.

Bibtex

@conference{ff634bde6b6d429984721a5516ae5240,
title = "What are the benefits of using silicon as a nutrient for strawberry growth?",
abstract = "Silicon is considered to be a non-essential element in strawberry production, previous work at the University of Hertfordshire has shown that the use of silicon in fertigation systems has enhanced the constitutive defence pathway of the strawberry crop and has additional benefits such as increased chlorophyll content of leaves, increased Brix values of fruit and increased pollen viability. In a hydroponic experiment in 2018, plants received weekly treatments of a silicon solution (0.017%) were compared to plants with no exposure to silicon. Treated plants had significantly more leaves, runners and fruits and a significant increase in chlorophyll content of the leaves (p<0.05). Also, fruits obtained from the treated plants, had significantly higher Brix levels, a greater mass and size than those from the untreated plants. No deficiency symptoms were observed in the untreated plants. A second hydroponic experiment began in January 2019 to investigate whether silicon can ever be toxic to strawberry plants. Weekly applications of potassium silicate were compared to the use of the silicon nutrient without potassium, at different concentrations; results are expected by June 2019. From the results of the first hydroponic experiment, it can be seen that strawberry plants are not naturally deficient in silicon, however, it is a limiting factor in their growth and plants can benefit from regular treatments of silicon. ",
author = "Wileman, {H J} and Avice Hall and Carmilla Asiana",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2020 The Author(s). This an open access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.; Biostimulants World Congress ; Conference date: 18-11-2019 Through 21-11-2019",
year = "2019",
month = nov,
day = "18",
language = "English",
url = "https://informaconnect.com/4th-biostimulants-world-congress/",

}

RIS

TY - CONF

T1 - What are the benefits of using silicon as a nutrient for strawberry growth?

AU - Wileman, H J

AU - Hall, Avice

AU - Asiana, Carmilla

N1 - © 2020 The Author(s). This an open access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

PY - 2019/11/18

Y1 - 2019/11/18

N2 - Silicon is considered to be a non-essential element in strawberry production, previous work at the University of Hertfordshire has shown that the use of silicon in fertigation systems has enhanced the constitutive defence pathway of the strawberry crop and has additional benefits such as increased chlorophyll content of leaves, increased Brix values of fruit and increased pollen viability. In a hydroponic experiment in 2018, plants received weekly treatments of a silicon solution (0.017%) were compared to plants with no exposure to silicon. Treated plants had significantly more leaves, runners and fruits and a significant increase in chlorophyll content of the leaves (p<0.05). Also, fruits obtained from the treated plants, had significantly higher Brix levels, a greater mass and size than those from the untreated plants. No deficiency symptoms were observed in the untreated plants. A second hydroponic experiment began in January 2019 to investigate whether silicon can ever be toxic to strawberry plants. Weekly applications of potassium silicate were compared to the use of the silicon nutrient without potassium, at different concentrations; results are expected by June 2019. From the results of the first hydroponic experiment, it can be seen that strawberry plants are not naturally deficient in silicon, however, it is a limiting factor in their growth and plants can benefit from regular treatments of silicon.

AB - Silicon is considered to be a non-essential element in strawberry production, previous work at the University of Hertfordshire has shown that the use of silicon in fertigation systems has enhanced the constitutive defence pathway of the strawberry crop and has additional benefits such as increased chlorophyll content of leaves, increased Brix values of fruit and increased pollen viability. In a hydroponic experiment in 2018, plants received weekly treatments of a silicon solution (0.017%) were compared to plants with no exposure to silicon. Treated plants had significantly more leaves, runners and fruits and a significant increase in chlorophyll content of the leaves (p<0.05). Also, fruits obtained from the treated plants, had significantly higher Brix levels, a greater mass and size than those from the untreated plants. No deficiency symptoms were observed in the untreated plants. A second hydroponic experiment began in January 2019 to investigate whether silicon can ever be toxic to strawberry plants. Weekly applications of potassium silicate were compared to the use of the silicon nutrient without potassium, at different concentrations; results are expected by June 2019. From the results of the first hydroponic experiment, it can be seen that strawberry plants are not naturally deficient in silicon, however, it is a limiting factor in their growth and plants can benefit from regular treatments of silicon.

M3 - Poster

T2 - Biostimulants World Congress

Y2 - 18 November 2019 through 21 November 2019

ER -